Tree Adoption Gallery

Showing: 41 to 46 of 46 trees

  • Tulip Tree

    Tulip Tree

    Liriodendron tulipifera

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E15 Map

    Liriodendron tulipifera is a deciduous member of the family Magnoliaceae. One of the largest native trees of the eastern United States, in the wild it can grow to towering heights of 50m, with diameters of up to 3m, deep within the virgin cove forests of the Appalachian Mountains.

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  • Turkish Hazel

    Turkish Hazel

    Corylus colurna

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E14 Map

    Corylus colurna is the largest species of hazel tree - reaching up to 35m tall – and is widely cultivated for its ornamental value in countries across Europe and North America.

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  • Weeping Birch

    Weeping Birch

    Betula pendula ‘Tristis’

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E11 Map

    A medium-sized deciduous tree, Betula pendula naturally occurs in Europe and northern Asia at high latitudes, and grows up to 25 m tall. It is cultivated for its slender, drooping branches. Betula produces wind-pollinated catkins before the leaves in early spring, and in autumn its leaves turn a beautiful golden colour.

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  • Wych Elm

    Wych Elm

    Ulmus glabra

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Dawyck, D14 Map

    Wych elm mainly survives in northern and western Scotland, beyond the range of Dutch elm disease, which has destroyed so many elms elsewhere in Britain.

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  • Yew

    Yew

    Taxus baccata

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Dawyck, D06 Map

    This is an evergreen coniferous tree, with separate male and female plants.

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  • Yoshino Cherry

    Yoshino Cherry

    Prunus x yedoensis

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E07 Map

    First introduced to Europe in the early 1900’s, this cherry is a hybrid of unknown origin, but is commonly cultivated in Japan, especially around Tokyo and Yokohama where it is known as the Yoshino cherry. It is a deciduous, free-flowering tree, widely planted in gardens due to its vibrant displays of blossom. The tree’s small cherry-like fruit are an important source of food for many garden birds and small mammals.

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The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh is a charity (registration number SC007983)