Tree Adoption Gallery

Showing: 41 to 45 of 45 trees

  • Turkish Hazel

    Turkish Hazel

    Corylus colurna

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E14 Map

    Corylus colurna is the largest species of hazel tree - reaching up to 35m tall – and is widely cultivated for its ornamental value in countries across Europe and North America.

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  • Weeping Birch

    Weeping Birch

    Betula pendula ‘Tristis’

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E11 Map

    A medium-sized deciduous tree, Betula pendula naturally occurs in Europe and northern Asia at high latitudes, and grows up to 25 m tall. It is cultivated for its slender, drooping branches. Betula produces wind-pollinated catkins before the leaves in early spring, and in autumn its leaves turn a beautiful golden colour.

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  • Wych Elm

    Wych Elm

    Ulmus glabra

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Dawyck, D14 Map

    Wych elm mainly survives in northern and western Scotland, beyond the range of Dutch elm disease, which has destroyed so many elms elsewhere in Britain.

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  • Yew

    Yew

    Taxus baccata

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Dawyck, D06 Map

    This is an evergreen coniferous tree, with separate male and female plants.

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  • Yoshino Cherry

    Yoshino Cherry

    Prunus x yedoensis

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E07 Map

    First introduced to Europe in the early 1900’s, this cherry is a hybrid of unknown origin, but is commonly cultivated in Japan, especially around Tokyo and Yokohama where it is known as the Yoshino cherry. It is a deciduous, free-flowering tree, widely planted in gardens due to its vibrant displays of blossom. The tree’s small cherry-like fruit are an important source of food for many garden birds and small mammals.

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The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh is a charity (registration number SC007983)