Tree Adoption Gallery

Showing: 21 to 28 of 28 trees

  • Scots Pine

    Scots Pine

    Pinus sylvestris

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E32 Map

    The Pinus sylvestris or Scots Pine is the national tree of Scotland, and the only pine native to northern Europe. This iconic species is an evergreen conifer, which can grow up to 25 m in height when mature.

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  • Silver Birch

    Silver Birch

    Betula pendula

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E33 Map

    Betula pendula is one of the most common of Britain’s native broad-leaved tree species, and grows abundantly across the UK, although in Scotland Betula pubescens or Downy Birch is more common. It is of high conservation value, as its canopy encourages the growth of a varied ground flora, providing a food source for many insects, birds and other animals.

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  • Silver Lime

    Silver Lime

    Tilia tomentosa

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E17 Map

    Tilia tomentosa is widely grown as an ornamental tree throughout Europe, and has been in cultivation since 1767. Typically growing up to 35m tall, this tree is of sturdy nature and very tolerant of urban pollution, soil compaction, heat, and drought.

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  • Sweet Chestnut

    Sweet Chestnut

    Castanea sativa

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E34 Map

    Also known as the Sweet Chesnut or Marron, Castanea sativa is a species of the diverse flowering plant Fagaceae family of beech and oak trees. The trees are hardy, long lived and well known for the edible chestnuts they produce, as well as for timber.

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  • Tulip Tree

    Tulip Tree

    Liriodendron tulipifera

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E15 Map

    Liriodendron tulipifera is a deciduous member of the family Magnoliaceae. One of the largest native trees of the eastern United States, in the wild it can grow to towering heights of 50m, with diameters of up to 3m, deep within the virgin cove forests of the Appalachian Mountains.

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  • Turkish Hazel

    Turkish Hazel

    Corylus colurna

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E14 Map

    Corylus colurna is the largest species of hazel tree - reaching up to 35m tall – and is widely cultivated for its ornamental value in countries across Europe and North America.

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  • Weeping Birch

    Weeping Birch

    Betula pendula ‘Tristis’

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E11 Map

    A medium-sized deciduous tree, Betula pendula naturally occurs in Europe and northern Asia at high latitudes, and grows up to 25 m tall. It is cultivated for its slender, drooping branches. Betula produces wind-pollinated catkins before the leaves in early spring, and in autumn its leaves turn a beautiful golden colour.

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  • Yoshino Cherry

    Yoshino Cherry

    Prunus x yedoensis

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E07 Map

    First introduced to Europe in the early 1900’s, this cherry is a hybrid of unknown origin, but is commonly cultivated in Japan, especially around Tokyo and Yokohama where it is known as the Yoshino cherry. It is a deciduous, free-flowering tree, widely planted in gardens due to its vibrant displays of blossom. The tree’s small cherry-like fruit are an important source of food for many garden birds and small mammals.

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The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh is a charity (registration number SC007983)