Tree Adoption Gallery

Showing: 21 to 30 of 46 trees

  • Japanese Wingnut

    Japanese Wingnut

    Pterocarya rhoifolia

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E08 Map

    Pterocarya rhoifolia is a deciduous tree belonging to the walnut family. A substantial and sturdy species which can grow up to 30 m in height, it is a native of the valleys and mountains of northern Japan, and is one of the largest deciduous trees found in this region. It also naturally occurs in eastern China. Pterocarya rhoifolia was introduced to European cultivation in 1888, and RBGE has collected this species during fieldwork in Japan.

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  • Juniper

    Juniper

    Juniperus communis

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Dawyck, D16 Map

    Juniper wood burns with little smoke and so was a favoured source of fire for illicit whisky stills.

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  • Katsura

    Katsura

    Cercidiphyllum japonicum

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E12 Map

    This tree is one of two members of the single genus in the family Cercidiphyllaceae. A native of Japan and China, it is grown in the West largely for ornamental purposes, although in western China many pharmacies sell the tree’s bark for its medicinal properties.

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  • Kobushi Magnolia

    Kobushi Magnolia

    Magnolia kobus

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E31 Map

    Native to the mountains of Honshu and Hokkaido in northern Japan, Magnolia kobus is a deciduous tree, first introduced to cultivation in Britain in 1879 by Charles Maries.

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  • Korshinsky's Pear

    Korshinsky's Pear

    Pyrus korshinskyi

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E20 Map

    This magnificent specimen is the largest of its species in cultivation in Britain, and registered as a Champion Tree on the Tree Register of the British Isles. Wild pears are native to the Old World, from western Europe to north Africa, and across Asia. A native of Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan, Pyrus korshinskyi is listed on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as Critically Endangered.

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  • Lime

    Lime

    Tilia species

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Dawyck, D03 Map

    Lime flowers are rich in nectar and very attractive to insects, especially bees.

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  • Monkey Puzzle

    Monkey Puzzle

    Araucaria araucana

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E24 Map

    Native to southern Chile and southern Argentina, the monkey puzzle is listed as a Natural Monument in Chile. This gives it legal protection on account of its vulnerability, due to habitat loss as a result of burning, grazing and logging.

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  • Paperbark Maple

    Paperbark Maple

    Acer griseum

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E01 Map

    Native to central China at altitudes between 1,500 and 2,000 m, the paperbark maple is endangered in the wild due to its small, fragmented populations, which are in decline. A third of all maple species are now under threat of extinction in their native habitats.

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  • Prickly Castor Oil Tree

    Prickly Castor Oil Tree

    Kalopanax septemlobus

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E19 Map

    Kalopanax septemlobus is a large, deciduous tree, widely distributed in eastern Asia (including China, Korea, Russia and Japan), it was first described by C.P. Thunberg in 1784 - based on specimens collected on his important visit to Japan. Seed of the tree was first introduced to Europe by the Russian botanist C.J. Maximowicz in 1865, and was reintroduced from western China (Hubei) by Ernest Wilson.

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  • Red Oak

    Red Oak

    Quercus rubra

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E16 Map

    This beautiful oak is a native to North America, and is known for its stunning red autumn leaves. In native forests it can grow up to an incredible 43m and in the UK it is mainly grown for ornamental purposes.

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