Tree Adoption Gallery

Showing: 11 to 20 of 46 trees

  • Chinese Mountain Ash

    Chinese Mountain Ash

    Sorbus glabriuscula

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E26 Map

    This small tree naturally occurs in dense forests on mountain slopes and gullies of western China, specifically the province of Hubei, from which it takes its scientific name. In the summer months it produces clouds of white flowers, which are popular with bees. Its delicate leaves are initially tinged bluish-green, before transforming to warmer hues in the autumn, and offering large clusters of fruit along its slender branches.

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  • Dawn Redwood

    Dawn Redwood

    Metasequoia glyptostroboides

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E22 Map

    The dawn redwood is a member of the Cypress family. Unusually for a conifer, most of which are evergreen, it is a deciduous tree – shedding its flattened needles after they turn reddish-brown in the autumn, and flushing anew each spring. It produces small, pendulous cones.

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  • Gean

    Gean

    Prunus avium

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Dawyck, D17 Map

    The gean is a familiar presence in natural deciduous woodland.

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  • Goat Willow

    Goat Willow

    Salix caprea

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Dawyck, D10 Map

    Regarded a weed by foresters, the goat willow is actually one of our most valuable trees for wildlife.

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  • Hazel

    Hazel

    Corylus avellana

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Dawyck, D08 Map

    This small shrubby tree is naturally multi-stemmed. Such growth forms are also promoted by the practice of ‘coppicing’, in which the useful stems are harvested on a regular cycle.

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  • Himalayan Birch

    Himalayan Birch

    Betula utilis

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E21 Map

    This beautiful tree is a native of the Himalayas. Deforestation, due to overuse for purposes such as firewood, has caused loss of habitat for many native groves. Selected cultivars with differing bark colours are widely cultivated in Western gardens.

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  • Himalayan Cedar

    Himalayan Cedar

    Cedrus deodara

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E18 Map

    A native of the Himalayas and the national tree of Pakistan, Cedrus deodara is a large conifer which can grow up to a staggering 75m in the wild. Its name originates from ‘devdar’, meaning ‘timber of the gods’. A majestic evergreen, this tree is widely grown for its timber in many parts of southern Europe, but is also of great ornamental value in Britain.

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  • Holly

    Holly

    Ilex aquifolium

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Dawyck, D02 Map

    With its prickly evergreen leaves holly is possibly the easiest Scottish tree to recognise.

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  • Japanese Maple

    Japanese Maple

    Acer palmatum

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E28 Map

    Native to Japan, Acer palmatum is a small deciduous tree, reaching a height of 6–10 m, and in the wild preferring shaded woodlands. Widespread throughout the Japanese islands, it also grows in North and South Korea, China, eastern Mongolia and southeast Russia. Brought into cultivation by the Japanese centuries ago, the species was first introduced to England in 1820. There now exist an extraordinary number of cultivars, grown in temperate areas around the world for their attractive leaf forms and colours, particularly spectacular during the autumn months.

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  • Japanese Red Pine

    Japanese Red Pine

    Pinus densiflora ‘Umbraculifera’

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E25 Map

    Closely related to the Scots pine, Pinus densiflora is a native to the east, and is perhaps the most common tree in Japan. It is hugely popular as an ornamental tree, particularly in bonsai, and is widely featured in parks and formal gardens.

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The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh is a charity (registration number SC007983)