Tree Adoption Gallery

Showing: 1 to 10 of 46 trees

  • Alder

    Alder

    Alnus glutinosa

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Dawyck, D07 Map

    Alder is a pioneer tree of wet places, helping to stabilise river banks.

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  • Ash

    Ash

    Fraxinus excelsior

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Dawyck, D12 Map

    Ash is one of the commonest large trees in Scottish woodlands.

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  • Aspen

    Aspen

    Populus tremula

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Dawyck, D18 Map

    Aspen leaves tremble, even in the slightest breeze. This has given rise to many of its common names, including its Gsaelic form, which means ‘quivering one’.

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  • Atlas Cedar

    Atlas Cedar

    Cedrus atlantica

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E04 Map

    Cedrus atlantica, commonly known as the Atlas cedar, is an evergreen conifer native to the Atlas Mountains in northern Africa. A variety with vivid bluish foliage was introduced into cultivation in UK in 1841, and planted for the first time in 1845. This majestic tree is now one of the most widely planted of ornamental conifers. It grows up to 35 m high, its beautiful needles borne in tufted clusters.

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  • Beech

    Beech

    Fagus sylvatica

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Dawyck, D13 Map

    Not a true native, this species was introduced from southern Britain for ornament and shelter.

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  • Bird Cherry

    Bird Cherry

    Prunus padus

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Dawyck, D09 Map

    This tree flourishes on stream sides and woodland edges.

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  • Campbell’s Magnolia

    Campbell’s Magnolia

    Magnolia campbellii ‘Charles Raffill’

    Status:
    Adopted
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E30 Map

    Considered one of the finest of all magnolias, Magnolia campbellii is a medium to large-sized deciduous tree, growing to 30 m. This tree produces a wonderful spectacle in early spring, as its huge flowers emerge and blanket the tree in shades of vivid crimson and white. Native to the Himalayas, from eastern Nepal to Myanmar and China at altitudes of 2,500-3,000 m, Magnolia campbellii is mainly grown for its ornamental value.

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  • Caucasian Wingnut

    Caucasian Wingnut

    Pterocarya fraxinifolia

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E06 Map

    An elegant and majestic tree, Pterocarya fraxinifolia is rarely encountered in gardens the UK, perhaps due to its widely spreading habit. Native to the lush river valleys of Iran and central Asia, it favours moist soil and plenty of light. This deciduous tree is a stunning sight during the late summer months, when covered in slender catkins, bearing distinctively winged nuts.

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  • Chinese Golden Larch

    Chinese Golden Larch

    Pseudolarix amabilis

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E05 Map

    A deciduous tree, Pseudolarix amabilis is a native of eastern China, and was first introduced to the UK in 1854. The English name, golden larch, refers to the colour of its autumn foliage. but this tree is a member of the pine family (Pinaceae). It has a superficial similarity to the true larch (Larix), but is more closely related to Keteleeria, Abies and Cedrus. This magnificent species is relatively uncommon in British gardens.

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  • Chinese Mahogany

    Chinese Mahogany

    Toona sinensis

    Status:
    Available for adoption
    Location:
    Edinburgh, E03 Map

    This deciduous tree is native to eastern and south-eastern Asia, and was first introduced to Britain in 1862. It was not until the late 1990’s that the species gained its common name, indicating its membership to the mahogany family (Meliaceae). The fruit, bark, wood and roots are used widely in China for numerous purposes, including as a vegetable, in traditional Chinese medicine and in timber and furniture manufacture. It is also commonly burnt in temples, releasing a delicate, sweet scent.

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The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh is a charity (registration number SC007983)